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These-- along with any other travel you plan to do on your own-- will be your primary out-of-pocket expenses. Also, remember to think about the cost of storage units if you are going abroad for a semester or year. Other Scripps students are eager to share storage units in order to cut down on costs. For those of you on one of the meal plans, flex will soon become one of your closest friends.

Remember, this is per semester, so make it last. Just tell the employee behind the counter that you want your mocha or pizza or whatever it is you're purchasing to be charged to flex, hand them your student ID card, and voila: You can also use flex dollars to swipe in a friend to one of the dining halls for a discounted price. Claremont Cash Claremont Cash is different from your flex dollars. Cash in this account needs to be loaded on from your own bank account or that of a parent if they are willing and able. And you don't have to worry about using all of this money before the end of the semester: Claremont Cash can be used in the Scripps Store in Seal Court, in the Huntley Bookstore, as a substitute for flex dollars in the dining halls and cafes across the 5C's, as a way to pay for laundry in the residence halls, and at a number of locations in the Claremont Village such as 21 Choices, a popular fro-yo place.

If you run out? Load more on the website whenever you like. Laundry Whether you intend to wash your clothes once every week or once every semester, laundry at Scripps is not too complicated and is highly recommended. Make sure you then start the machine with the desired setting before leaving the room. But your job doesn't end there. Once you start the machine, Tip: Make sure ing lines conveniently set up for stuyou come back to the laundry room to switch or dents.

If you can, skip the dryer and retrieve your laundry by the time that the washer hang up your clothes on these lines. You should have received a piece of paper in the mail over the summer one of the many from Scripps with the address of your new student mailbox number. You will also receive a combination to the lock on this mailbox. Take a picture of your combination, put it in your phone, write it down, put it in your planner.

The employees in the mailroom will give you one freebie each semester where they will remind you of your combination if you forget, but after that, it's up to you. I like to check my mailbox pretty often especially if I'm expecting a card from my mom or my grandparents. For those of you with an on-campus job, checking your mailbox every other Friday may soon become the highlight of your week because that's your payday.

Scripps will send your paycheck in the mail, and you can deposit your checks at one of the ATMs in the Village or using an app on your phone. The mailroom is also where you will receive packages on campus. If you give them your cell phone number, they will send you a text when your package arrives. They will also send you an email telling you to pick up your package at your earliest convenience. The Huntley Bookstore is open to the public and to students at any of the seven colleges. You may use it to purchase notebooks, pens, staplers, poster putty, greeting cards, Claremont and Scripps apparel, and any of the course-specific textbooks you'll need for your classes.

Many of the course textbooks are also available to rent for the semester. Keep in mind that The Huntley is not always the most affordable option. When looking for textbooks, ask around campus and try to find an upperclassman who has already taken the class that would be willing to sell you their books for a discounted price. Many students also take advantage of Amazon or other online vendors for their books. Amazon offers a free sixmonth membership of Amazon Prime to college students. Take advantage of this! You get free two-day shipping on lots of products. Essentials Course Registration When it comes time to register for courses, you will be given a time-slot.

Make sure you have several back-up plans for your schedule when it comes time to sign up. You will need to meet with your advisor before you can be cleared to register, and your advisor will help you design an appropriate schedule for your first semester. Students will panic when they don't get into the courses they desire, but try not to stress too much. As a first-year, there will be classes that you don't get into.

It happens to everyone. Try PERM-ing this will be explained to you during orientation , email the professor, and show up to that class on the first day of school if you can. If the professor still doesn't let you in, try not to worry too much. You'll get the classes you need, it just might take some time.

Wait until next semester and fill that time-slot with another course. Registration all happens on the Scripps Portal, and you will be given your login sometime during the summer. The Portal is also where you can look for classes in the course database. Sakai is your home for specific class information. Once you register for classes, this is where your assignments will be posted, and many professors will have you submit papers to Sakai through the dropbox. Use the roster on Sakai if you need to look up the name or email address of a classmate, and take advantage of the course syllabus that most professors post on the site.

It should be on their websites by the time you get this, so feel free to fill it in! Snacks are also served Tuesday evenings from 9: They usually have something warm like waffles, corn dogs, or chicken nuggets, plus cookies, cereal, fruit, vegetables and dip, tea, and milk. Monday — Friday, noon — 1 p. Saturday - Sunday Brunch: Saturday — Sunday Brunch: McConnell has themes for each weeknight: Monday - Thursday Late night: Hungry after a long evening of studying? Come to the Coop Fountain, your student-managed and student-staffed on-campus restaurant! Try our daily specials, or get one of our classic Coop Meals to refuel.

Jay, an engineering major and proctor of North Dorm, was a free-spirited person who lived life to the fullest. Monday — Thursday, Sunday: Motley Coffeehouse Scripps Location: To be a socially responsible business that explores diverse feminist critiques; To connect the Claremont Colleges with local and global communities by perpetuating sustainable supply chains; To foster independent thinking and purposeful change.

They also sell coffee and baked goods. Using a Motley mug means you must leave your ID at the counter until you return the mug. Smith Campus Center Phone: Come by with your friends to relax, enjoy all-natural beef burgers, traditional pub-style favorites and signature made-to-order deli sandwiches and wraps. Enjoy freshly-prepared grab and go sandwiches and salads, made-from -scratch soups, house made desserts and an array of bottled beverages.

Michael Shanahan Center for Teaching and Learning. The Pit Stop Location: There is free printer and wireless Internet access. The Grove House Phone: Scripps College has provided you with a list of items they recommend you bring to Scripps. I have looked at this list and made a few changes.

You will have a hard time buying one here in August due to the heat and everyone else buying them. This is up to you. There is plasticware in the dining hall, and communal dishes in the kitchens. Though I'd recommend having your own items. I recommend Command hanging strips or painter's blue tape. Poster putty, I've found, doesn't work, and it can be hard to remove. If you have food in your room, I highly recommend having containers like a bin so that you don't get bugs. A lot of the first-year dorms used to house fewer students, so the outlets are often hard to reach.

I highly recommend one of these! The lighting in the dorms varies. If you live in the older dorms, you'll probably need a desk lamp. If you don't think you'll have an opportunity to restock, bring a lot of soap. Both for shower use and for washing hands. You might want to get one that has drainage out the bottom so it doesn't get moldy or fill with water. More likely than not, your room will not be next to the laundry room, so it's good to have some kind of thing to carry it. You know your study methods best, but keep in mind that some professors do not allow laptops in class so you might have to take notes by hand.

This is the oldest dorm on campus, and it boasts a gorgeous browsing room, courtyard, and monastic atmosphere. As a first-year, you might be in the newer hallway toward the computer lab, the second floor doubles, or in other rooms. Toll has singles, doubles, and triples, and each set of two triples has a bathroom that connects the rooms. There are three floors. There are very large study areas here, also. It is beautiful and has a cozy feel to it.

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Being so close to the rose garden is another plus! On the other side of the rose garden from Toll sits Browning, another of the older dorms on campus. Although it is historic and similar to Toll, it has its own distinct charm as well. Unique to this hall is Browning Tower, which is accessible from the third floor. Check it out to see an amazing view, day or night. This dorm has singles, doubles, triples, and quads which have their own bathrooms. Unfortunately, there is no AC. Clark is the largest of the four older dorms, and unlike the other three, it DOES have air conditioning—yay!

There are singles, doubles, and triples. The high ceiling and interior balcony of the common room make it a very notable-looking area for the residence halls. Like in the Toll triples, these have a shared bathroom connecting two triple rooms. Some more similarities between Toll and Clark are the interior courtyards and shared Oasis Court, which provides a beautiful view from many rooms. Dorsey is the newest of the four old dorms Dorsey was the newest dorm for 30 years!

Continuing with the olderstyle, traditional beauty of the old dorms, you can find a courtyard, browsing room, and common rooms among the singles, doubles, triples, and quads. The rooms have a lot of character, and I know of at least one that even has an old fireplace. Again, there is no AC. As of this summer, Wilbur and its connected building Kimberly are undergoing some changes—most notably air conditioning and a new roof. Wilbur is the smallest residence hall, housing only 25 or so students. Together, Wilbur and Kimberly are the size of the other dorms. As of this fall, it will have air conditioning.

Kimberly is the first of the newer dorms, and it stretches from the area behind Margaret Fowler to the Tiernan Field House. It has two kitchens, an amazing common room, and a courtyard reminiscent of yet still different from the ones of the old dorms. Unlike all the other dorms, however, there are no water fountains, so if you live here you should definitely look into getting a water filter.

This dorm has singles, doubles, conjoined doubles, triples, and 5-person suites, which feature single rooms around a bathroom and common area. This dorm is also a landmark in its accessibility for students, as it has automatic entrance doors and an elevator. They share the entrance lobby only, but the computer lab in Frankel serves as the lab for both halls. Routt has three floors containing 7-person suites these have 7 individual rooms plus a common area and bathroom , triples with the conjoined bathrooms , doubles, and a few singles.

There is air conditioning. There are many balconies, and from many rooms, you can hear the bubbling of nearby fountains. Each of these apartments contains two doubles, a sizeable kitchen, and common spaces. This building is considered to be part of Routt. Designed in harmony with the distinctive look of the first residence halls, the new hall will feature the visual texture, courtyards, browsing room, living room, and beautiful grounds students and alumnae cherish.

All units have a full kitchen, living room, bathroom, and patio, and are fully furnished with cable and internet access. Preference will be given to junior and senior students and to those who will be here for the entire academic year. All units have a full kitchen, living room, two bathrooms, and are fully furnished with cable and internet access. Preference will be given to junior and senior students and those who will be here for the entire academic year.

The house contains a bathroom, a washer and dryer, and living room with cable television and Ethernet connections. This house will be available to five students who prefer single rooms and share the common areas of the home. In short, a Scripps student exchanges hall draw spots with a student from one of the other Claremont Colleges.

The students then participate in hall draw to select their new dorm room on their non-home campus for the coming year. Then again, you might not. When it comes to random roommates, you can find yourself living with your absolute best friend s. Other times, though, you wind up hating their guts and their every move. Maybe your roommate is the most nagging individual and is severely grossed out by your messy living habits.

The really important thing to remember is this: College kids have sex. When it comes to sexiling your roommate, be considerate. Ideally, sexiling would occur when your roommate s have zero reason to be in your room. I had night classes last semester, so timing worked out for my roommate. Tell them what the deal is. Neither you nor your roommate wants accidental walk-ins.

If your roommate is the one sexiling you; please, do not slut shame them. I cannot deal with the excessive sexiling.

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Please dial it down. Respect will go a long way. If you and your roommate s absolutely cannot see eye to eye, RAs and Peer Mentors are fantastic resources. They are your friends. They want the best for you. Communication is key You'll already be all up in each other's personal space because you don't really have a choice, but you don't need to make it worse by not talking to each other about what is important.

If something bothers you, tell them. If you are feeling claustrophobic, tell them. Also remember to ask them what makes them uncomfortable, and then strive to avoid doing those things. Avoid clutter My room actually had a lot of space to store stuff. We had a huge walk-in closet, which helped. However, the less stuff you bring, the better. Try to be pragmatic about what you bring with you to school. Keep stuff on your side This sounds really childish don't-cross-this-line-this-is-my-side but there's some truth to it.

I'm a very tidy person at school because i don't like clutter and my roommate first year was definitely not tidy. She also had a lot more stuff than I did. However, she did a great job of keeping her clutter on "her side" of the room, so I never found myself stressed out or overwhelmed by her mess. My side was nice and clean. But I did pick up some tips! Make sure you get a fan before arrival in August. If you try to buy one in a store in August, they might not have any left due to a heat wave. Make sure that your fan works ahead of time, or you will have to wait one of my roommates ran into this problem.

If you are at the top of a bunk bed, you can buy small fans that clip onto the side or can sit on a clip-on shelf. That thing was LOUD. They are also good for circulating out that hot air. At night, put the fan in front of the window so that it can bring in cool air. Usually, it cools down significantly at night, so you can leave your window slightly open but not enough for a security hazard! If you want ice, you can find some at the Tiernan Field House, or keep some of your own in a dorm or private freezer. I know that there are some nice thick, cozy bedding options available, but you might have to put those on hold until it cools down.

Jersey sheets like those they sell at Target might make you feel much hotter, for example. Having cold water kept me going throughout the day when you have to walk all over Claremont to get to various classes, etc. There are water fountains in some dorms, or water filters are good options. Also, feed your body with healthy food because it's hard being a first year and an athlete, and drink lots of water alllllll day. This is a great group that is an open space for people from all religious backgrounds or no religious background that gets together bimonthly and plans community service events, panels, and other events for the 7C community to discuss various topics revolving around religion and service.

Ther e ar e cur r ently two chaplains one Catholic, one J ewish employed by the McAlister Center for Religious Life that serve all five colleges. Father Joe holds services for all holy days of obligation and extra weekly services during the season of Lent.


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The Claremont Catholics often meet about once a week over pizza for discussions. Father Joe hosts the pizza nights for Catholic students and their friends on Thursday nights. He also has a movie night on Wednesday nights where you can go and watch classic movies. Joe is always willing to work with students on their various ideas for what they would like to see from McAlister. There is an initiative to institute a solely Muslim Chaplain, but as of the beginning of Fall , there is not such a position.

The initiative will continue. Hillel of the Claremont Colleges -- Housed in McAlister and run by Rabbi Daveen and a student board, Hillel hosts Shabbat services typically both Reform and Conservative every Friday night that are followed by a kosher meal cooked by members of the Hillel board. Typically, between five and fifteen students attend services and fifteen to forty students attend the dinners each week, along with at least ten community members typically, these are families with a parent connected in some way to one of the colleges.

Also, some people come every week, but it is totally okay to come less frequently. Each Shabbat typically has a different theme, and sometimes other activities or discussions follow the dinner. Hillel also houses the Jewish Mentor Program and First Year Students of Hillel, which are great ways for Jewish first years to meet each other and older Jewish students. You can get involved with both of these and learn more about Hillel at the Welcome Back Bagel Brunch that will be hosted at McAlister during orientation. Chabad of the Claremont Colleges -- Established on campus about two years ago, Chabad offers a somewhat different experience than Hillel.

It is run by a young ultra-orthodox couple, and many events are held in their family home along with their two young children. Chabad holds a lunch and Torah study session every Friday, Shabbat dinner every Friday night, and Shabbat lunch every Saturday, as well as a bunch of different holiday commemorations.

Chabad tends to be more religiously observant than Hillel and the unofficial dress code for Shabbat events is similar to Hillel -- make sure to cover your shoulders! Before coming to Chabad, some students are initially turned off by the level of observance, but the Chabad in Claremont is extremely welcoming to students from all religious backgrounds and to non-Jews. Many students consistently use both the resources of Hillel and Chabad, and attending one does not preclude you.

Kehillah Scr ipps only -- Formerly known as Jewish Dialogue Group, Kehillah was founded this past year as a space for Scripps students to explore their Jewish identities and the way Judaism intersects with other experiences and aspects of identity. InterVarsity pr ovides oppor tunities for student fellowship on campus.

However, students from any college are welcome at events hosted by either group! To connect and find specific times and locations of meetings, look for them online and on Facebook. There are many small group bible studies offered during the week. Specific groups are geared towards athletes, international students, and Hispanic students. InterVarsity also offers the opportunity to participate in Mark Study, an in-depth academic investigation of the Gospel of Mark. Students participate in retreats to Catalina Island during the school year and also attend regional and national Christian conferences.

An examples includes volunteering for Pomona Hope, a tutoring program for disadvantaged students in Pomona. Claremont Ekklesia Clar emont students wr ite, edit, and design for the Ekklesia, a journal of Christian thought. The Ekklesia aims to provide a space where students can participate in faith-based dialogue, explore the intersection between academia and Christianity, and use Christianity as a lens to explore a wide range of relevant topics.

The Ekklesia is entirely student-run and publishes once a semester. Many of these groups have collaborated, with each other and other campus organizations, to host exciting forums, panel discussions, and events. Examples have included a forum on women and gender in the Bible with faculty speakers, and a conference about evolution and creation. Stay tuned for a Veritas forum in the fall about the intersection of race and faith. There are several churches within walking and biking distance from the Claremont Colleges, and students often organize carpools to other churches in the area.

The MSA has an administrative board that also plans gatherings such as a Ramadan dinner or just social gatherings. Temple Beth Israel www. Good Shepherd Claremont St. Fr iends-Quakers-Meeting Claremont Other: Baldy Zen Center Hindu: Infor mation Center Rancho Cucamonga Sikh: You can also ask for extensions on. There are many resources on campus for both religious and non-religious students alike. The McAlister Center is a great one for students of all faiths. If you're looking for a church, 3CIV coordinates rides to churches in the area.

You can attend the large group meetings as well as small group meetings, and there are many events and conferences throughout the year. You definitely need to be intentional in seeking out these resources, but once you get plugged in, it is a great community to be a part of! Because the Claremont Colleges are liberal arts schools, the campus climate is very liberal and progressive.

As a Christian, I have found that my classmates are generally accepting when I discuss my faith and tell them that I am a Christian. However, the way that religion is addressed in the classroom does make me feel uncomfortable at times, especial y as Christianity is regarded and addressed as intolerant and as an institution of oppression. This is why I find that having a community of like-minded people on campus that share the same beliefs and values as you is so important.

There is no kosher or halal meal plan on the 5Cs, so if you want to keep kosher or halal you can either: Eat vegetarian food in the dining halls Pitzer and Scripps tend to have the best options and get home cooked kosher meat meals every Friday night Hillel or Chabad and Saturday lunch Chabad OR get special permission to go off of the meal plan and cook your own food. Look for an email from McAlister about a month before Passover to sign up. There is a halal pizza place that just opened up right in the village walking distance called Pie Street Pizza.

We hope to make this a place for Muslim students to hang out and talk, as a halal restaurant so close is rare! Lots of Scripps and 5C students are Jewish, but most are unaffiliated with the Jewish spaces on campus and do not engage in much religious practice. If you want to meet more engaged Jews, the obvious Jewish organizations are your best bet — Hillel, Chabad, and Kehillah. If you are interested, while none of them are Jewish organizations, each could be a great place to connect with other Jews from varied backgrounds and political opinions.

There are two Catholic services on Sunday; one at Typically there are more students at the 4: Nondenominational Christian services take place every Sunday, with participants meeting for lunch or brunch before or after. Special services are offered for important Christian holidays, often uniting Catholic students and other Christian students in collaboration. The McAlister Center also organizes service opportunities, forums, lectures, and other community-building events.

Check them out online for up-to-date information, service times, and more! Ekklesia and Intervarsity are other great groups for meeting other. The community can sometimes seem divided and small, but once you get to know one or two people, you will start to get to know the whole community, which is warm and approachable. If you want to start knowing the community, feel free to message me on Facebook--my name is Noor Hamdy Elfayoumi--or just call me and we can grab a meal and chat! I speak now personally from the experience of someone whose spirituality is not grounded in any institutional religious tradition, but I feel as though the same may be relatable to anyone who has difficulty integrating the vast complexities and conflicts of personality, which ultimately comprise our inherent human experience.

I have feared the extreme and polarizing judgments that I believed being open with my Faith may trigger-- being labeled somewhere negatively on the spectrum of being a culturally appropriating, "new age" hipster, or a brainwashed fanatic who is uneducated or uninterested in secular matters Neither of these limiting characterizations are true.

The truth is, we orchestrate the music of our own spectrums of judgement. By choosing Beautiful thoughts, Loving thoughts, Kind thoughts, Compassionate thoughts-- and aligning our actions with integrity to these thoughts-- we invite Ourselves and All whom we interact with into the infinite music of these vibrations. Mcalister center is a great resource and specifically a group within mcalister is the Mulitfaith Service Council which is a really great group that is an open space for people from all religious backgrounds or no religious background that gets together bimonthly and plans community service events, panels, and other events for the 7C community to discuss various topics revolving around religion and service.

On-Campus Student Religious and Spiritual Organizations The Student Religious and Spiritual Groups represented below are supported directly by or registered with the Chaplains of The Claremont Colleges, agree to be respectful of those who have different beliefs, and are open to and value the multi-religious experience of The Claremont Colleges. The Gospel Choir of The Claremont Colleges "Anointed" Gospel Choir is dedicated to providing the Claremont community with inspiration through gospel music while simultaneously ministering to the souls and hearts of those listening.

For more information visit the Anointed Gospel Choir website: Anyone is welcome to our meetings, Bible studies, and events--Christians of any background, students of other faiths, or students asking questions about faith. For more information www. Christian in the Academy An informal fellowship of graduate students from a variety of traditions who come together to share a meal and meet new friends. For more information please contact the Chaplains Office Claremont Christian Athletes The purpose of Claremont Colleges Christian Athletes is to provide a safe place where people may come to hear about and share in the power of God.

First, we hope to demonstrate that Christian faith and a vigorous intellectual life can be pursued together, each challenging and enriching the other. Second, we aim to use Christianity as a lens to critically examine and explore a broad range of subjects through academic scholarship, personal narrative and creative expression. Our hope is that bringing Christianity into dialogue with the creative learning of these colleges will stimulate discussion in a way that is relevant and engaging.

For more information, visit https: We serve the Jewish community in whatever ways we can, whether through social, religious, or social action opportunities, or through any other aspects of your daily life. For more information visit the Hillel website. Hindu Society Group gathers for holy days and special events. Jewish Mentor Program The Jewish Mentor Program strives to foster a sense of community for all Jews, religious and secular, by providing a space for students to self-identify as Jewish in whatever way they may choose. The program supports the diversity of experiences among Jews and hopes to serve as a medium for promoting dialogue on Jewish issues, both within the organization and beyond, through workshops, social events, and other programming.

The program not only serves as a resource for students to meet other Jewish first-years and find community, but it also strives to affirm all aspects of mentees' transition to college and personal growth. Multifaith Service Council The Multifaith Service Council, a group formed by the Office of the Chaplains, brings students of various faith, secular and spiritual traditions from the Claremont Colleges together to organize service projects, dialogues, and events to build community, peace, and understanding.

Some functions of the MSA are to develop a greater understanding of Islam, promote unity and conduct activities that increase unity and activism. Membership of the MSA is open to all students of the undergraduate schools, and the graduate schools. All traditions are accepted. We hope to create a space for pagans to congregate, worship, and form a community throughout all of the Colleges. Meeting times are weekly to socialize, plan rituals, and discuss paganism in general. Anyone is welcome to join the meetings or rituals. All are welcome to attend. This 7C Quaker group will be rooted in community.

Our meetings will be a space to transfer knowledge through community by having discussions on how to explore peace, justice and sustainability within the 7C's as well as outside of them. We are welcoming to students and community members of all faith backgrounds and sexual orientations. We also work to raise the wider community's awareness as to our presence. Soka Gakkai Buddhists Soka Gakkai International SGI is a Buddhist network that actively promotes peace, culture, and education through personal exchange and social contribution.

Soka Gakkai members embrace Nichiren Buddhism. Please visit the SGI's website for more information. During our meetings, we pray, study and discuss Buddhism and its application to our daily lives, and support each other in our faith. All are welcome to our meetings! Learn more about our campus activities. We meet once a week in the McAlister Center's library, often choosing a day and time that works best for the group's varying schedules. The meeting is one hour long and usually includes a short non-religious reading and related discussion, as well as a minute meditation.

D , yet also welcome students to volunteer to lead a meditation if they so choose. The club does not prescribe nor exhort any one faith, religion, or non-faith. As such, both religious and non-religious people are welcome, as are those who may yet still be exploring this path. We invite interested students to contact us. Zen Meditation In this group we practice basic mindfulness, learning to reside in the present moment and experience it fully.

An ancient practice that originated in Asia and is now being widely used in the West, mindfulness is not an effort to escape the place where we are, nor the pursuit of special, exotic states of consciousness. Instead, it is the cultivation of openness, acceptance and equanimity, enabling us to become more at peace with our lives. Parts of our experience that we have suppressed or pushed away are allowed back into our awareness.

This process of self-reconciliation enhances our capacity to handle stress and awakens renewed zest for life. Instead of divorcing the "spiritual" and "emotional" dimensions of our lives, we allow a time for personal sharing of our inner experiences, thus creating a small, supportive community. Off-Campus Organizations The Chaplains of The Claremont Colleges provide information to interested students about religious and spiritual resources in the area. Any off-campus religious organizations or individuals who seek to interact with students oncampus must work through the Chaplains Office.

For information regarding the policies and procedures, please contact the Office of the Chaplains or In past years some students have had painful experiences with certain destructive religious groups—groups not affiliated with the Claremont Colleges, which are not subject to the collaborative code of non- proselytizing and mutual respect on which the Claremont Colleges Office of The Chaplains has been founded. These groups are often less than candid about who they are and what their agenda is as they contact and in some unfortunate cases harass students, particularly newcomers.

If you believe that you are being recruited or harassed by such a high pressure group—or if you are concerned about a friend—contact any of the Chaplains. The Chaplains are here to help you have a healthy experience of your spiritual journey while you are at The Claremont Colleges.

Scripps is an exceptional environment in which to explore and discuss ideas that students may have never been exposed to previously. Classes are designed to best inspire conversations, and thoughts spil over the lawns and into dorms. Coming from a conservative family, though, my parents were less than thril ed with the new perspectives I gained at school.

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I had been looking forward to holiday dinners and telling everyone about Claremont, but no one wanted to hear what I had to say. I found myself defending California the entire time I was home, and at school, I had to defend the perspectives I had grown up with. Being open with my family about why I felt how I did helped us to move past any hostility, though we do get into debates and my dad shares a plethora of conservative articles with me. If you find that you feel indescribably angry or anxious while reading a syllabus, seriously consider dropping that course.

The deadline comes up really quickly, so keep track of it! Keep in mind that if you need to PERM ask for permission to enroll in a class, you should leave the professor enough time to respond, so PERM as soon as you think you may be looking to get into that class! This is also a good time to look at classes that might have reopened. Drop Deadline This is about halfway through the semester.

It is, however, significantly better than failing a class. But again, if it is between your well-being and your class, your well-being comes first. Many of you probably come from large schools where individual interaction with the teachers was not common-place. In Claremont, chances are that your professor will know your name. While they may not reach out if they think something is off, they will be happy to talk with you.

If you are like me and hate asking for things, maybe send an email. If you prefer face-to-face, try going to office hours or setting up an appointment. You might even be able to catch your professor after or before class briefly. Overloading I have never personally taken more than four classes in a semester.

It may seem like overloading is the norm, but in fact, it is not. I recommend thinking very carefully and meeting with your adviser if you are considering taking more than four classes in a semester. While the workload itself may not always be a problem, beware of the actual time that overloading will take up. Anyway, it is recommended officially that first-years do not overload. Get a feel for the way classes are, first!


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  • The only sneaky inconvenience would be buying books. More information on what this would look like can be found in the Burnout article in this guide. What to do if disaster strikes It happens. Warning letters are the first. There is no real penalty, but they are informing you as to what the more severe consequences can be. Academic probation is the next concerning status. If you show significant delays in regular progress towards graduation, you will be put on probation. Typically, to meet the terms of probation, a student must achieve a semester grade point average of 6.

    The Committee on Academic Review may choose to set additional or course-specific probationary terms. If the student meets all of the terms of probation but the cumulative grade point average remains below 6. If you are put on academic probation, you can try to unload some of this additional stress by remembering that Nobody here wants you to leave or be on probation.

    Talk to your professors. I know this advice is very repetitive, but it really does help. People can and will go out of their ways to help you. Incompletes Taking an incomplete in a class is at the discretion of the professor. If you do an incomplete, you must turn in the unfinished and agreed-upon work to your professor by the first week or two of the next semester.

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    Although it is up to the professors individually, you also need a form, which can be found on the registrar site and in the office. Petitions During your time here, you may need to petition. Information is from the registrar site, again: Petitions are required to: Seek exceptions to any published deadline including change in registration or intent to withdraw.

    Request a waiver of, or exception to, any stated academic regulation. Enroll in six or more courses. Complete a self-designed major. Participate in a combined degree or other accelerated program. Enroll for independent study credit. Enroll for independent internship credit. Petition that a specific course meet a specific general education requirement—the gender and women's studies requirement; the race and ethnic studies requirement; or a particular breadth of study requirement fine arts, letters, natural science, or social science.

    CORE 1 I came to Scripps from a middle-class, mostly white high school in Seattle where I fit in perfectly and thought I had received a fairly liberal education. Immediately after the first Core lecture, I realized we were going to look at violence in many forms, not just the gore in horror movies and physical violence I associated with the term. My first semester of college was spent learning that I had mounds and mounds of privilege. I present as a white, blonde, middle class, straight, able bodied, cis-gender woman.

    People who hold the power in institutions that systematically disenfranchise marginalized communities reflect these identities. At first glance, Core 1 seems like a normal first-year intro kind of class. It meets three times a week, once in a lecture with your entire class and twice in a discussion group with a designated faculty member and around 17 other students. You will read about a book a week, and they will cover all sorts of topics within the realm of the theme, which this year is violence.

    Each professor will give a lecture that provides insight on the topic of violence through the lens of their discipline. I sat in my core class and had highly intellectual conversations about these systems of violence that represented the experiences of my classmates and many other people worldwide. My classmates with marginalized identities were asked again and again to provide an opinion for an entire identity group they are a part of, which is fundamentally unfair, tokenizing, and should be challenged if you notice this happening in your own sections.

    While I personally felt engaged in the classroom discussion of hypotheticals, I was unable to understand that these power dynamics affected my daily reality. Consequently, I was given space to have discussions about the abstract ideas of racism, classism, ableism, transphobia, etc. After a year of attending appropriate trainings, workshops, and events --normally hosted by SCORE--and actively listening to my more marginalized peers which allowed me to work through what having privilege means and what I can do about it inside and outside of the classroom , I realized that Core needed an overhaul.

    It was not enough to teach an incoming class of students that violence exists in the world. There must be an empathetic and humbling component to an academic program when it deals with real human experiences and systems of power that the majority of our student population at Scripps benefits from. After recognizing that more privileged students were not engaging with the material on a personal, formative level while more marginalized students were having to pick up the slack from this unjust classroom power dynamic, we started the Core Mentor Program.

    The 17 students who make up the inaugural Core Mentor Team come from a wide variety of experiences inside and outside the Core classroom and hold many different identities. Each mentor has committed to working closely with one faculty member leading a section. The mentors will attend your weekly lectures so that they stay updated with what is being presented to you before classroom discussion and will also hold office hours for two hours each week.

    These office hours are meant as a space for you to come and talk about a concept you are having trouble grasping, an issue you are having with another student or faculty member, and, in general, for academic guidance. The mentors are there to serve you, and you can come to us with issues you would like to keep confidential, or we will help connect you with others in order to work through your issue.

    As the Core Mentor Program, our goal is to make Core a place where every Scripps student can connect what they learn in the Core classroom to their everyday life in order to become more empathetic, engaged champions for justice and equity. Apparently, med schools are starting to like Anthropology majors because they understand humans. If you DO want to do the Engineering program, you kind of need to know that as soon as possible.

    Physics majors pursue engineering careers as well. In general, your interests may surprise you! I know many people who suddenly decided to be pre-med Biology majors and people who shifted gears from Chemistry to humanities majors. Your first two years are prime time to explore and try out different majors. Look over the different majors and keep an open mind. In the end, follow your passions!

    At the time I applied to Scripps, I wanted to be a physicist. Did I fail out of math? See guide section on burnout for more information on this topic. I know it is scary to feel like you have no direction. Every class felt like a waste, and it would take me hours and hours and hours to complete simple assignments. I know, that sounds ridiculous.

    How could I forget that? When you have art beaten out of you for years, you tend to forget about it. When you start it again, you doubt you still have what it takes. But I stuck with it because I loved it, and everything finally fell into place. By the end of that semester, I was decided. It took a year-and-a-half of confusion followed by a semester or two of moping until I was ready.

    Maybe I felt that I needed to prove myself somehow. Maybe I felt I owed it to my scientist parents, whose own parents scorned the idea of colleges like Scripps. Or my high school, which made a huge campaign to get girls interested in STEM. On being a stem major, I would say again plan out your time, and use all the resources you can. Go to tutoring even if you don't really need it. Don't do your homework the night before. You can only walk once you receive your second BS degree with the year below you.

    It is so worth it to get a liberal arts and engineering education.

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    You will be one of the most well spoken and written engineering students you come across. You will have lots of classes with mostly boys and it will be frustrating. But going to an all girls school balances it out. Not many people know much about the program, including the Scripps faculty, staff, and even the registrar. You are basically on your own when registering for classes, so make sure you know exactly what requirements you need to fulfill. The registrar will not be of much help. Professor Higdon also likes it when students take charge and figure everything out themselves, but go to him if you are having trouble picking which class to take.

    It is hard to fulfill all the requirements for the program along with the Scripps requirements without overloading some, if not most, semesters. You need to submit your Major and Minor forms as if you were the year above. You must hold up a 3. Foundation requirements for Columbia as of The application is pretty short and easy.

    You need three recommendation letters one math, one science, and your advisor. Watch out for the application deadlines, they are usually in January. The thought of being able to attend two vastly different institutions was very interesting to me during my college application process. I knew I wanted to go into engineering, but I loved the. This program was the reason I attended the Claremont Colleges. In the past two and a half years here, the program has become even more appealing to me. I feel I can become a better, more-well rounded engineer by gaining a solid background in the core fields Scripps professors teach their students.

    I have gained a better understanding of gender studies, race and ethnic studies, and economics, and have become a better writer. I entered the program as a Chemical Engineering major, but soon switched to a Biomedical Engineering major. I feel that BME covers a larger span of fields and gives me an opportunity to explore the chemical engineering field as well as other fields. What is particularly interesting about a Biomedical Engineering degree is that I can do anything from creating medical devices to working in a lab with biomolecules.

    This gives me more options for a career path and allows me to work on a combination of different things on the macro and micro scale. I hope to continue my studies for an extra year at the secondary institu-. Although I am not certain what I will pursue as a career, I hope that my research will help others. I am by no means claiming that my experience is universal, nor should it be. In this article, I am trying to provide some tips, anecdotes, and background that may be useful to you. I apologize if you feel that this is not helpful to your personal experience—I hope that it is!

    If you feel that you are not represented here, please keep in mind that there are other resources, as well, and I am also trying to incorporate things that I have heard many other people discuss as well. WTF is this article about? Hello, new Scripps students, and welcome to the Claremont Consortium! Of course, as a top-notch liberal arts college, top-notch academics are a top priority here, which means… Workloads! This article will hopefully be a good resource for you when it comes to figuring out how to manage your college workload and life balance.

    Let the learning begin! High School and how to manage the difference The biggest, and probably the most commonly-discussed difference between high school and college is that in college, there is much more freedom. No longer will you be trapped in classrooms with teachers who love to assign coloring worksheets and other intellectually lacking, frustrating busy-work.

    Resources to Help with Time- and Work-Management There are workshops staggered throughout the year that focus on how to manage countless things—work, time, energy, your health, your life, etc. These are commonly sent out in emails or posted around campus, so keep your eyes open! Monsour Counseling and Psychological Services has workshops about these topics, and the Tiernan Field House also has Peer Health Educators that do some programming on stress-reduction which, of course, includes time-- and work-management.

    Related events pop up all the time, so my advice is. Professors and friends can also be really helpful in this area; they may have techniques that will work for you, too! I choose to believe the former. I start by writing down the official deadline on the calendar, and then I write down my own deadline—which I typically make at least a day before the actual deadline so that if disaster strikes which for my technologically incompetent self is anything tech-related; printer jam, pushing a weird button and not knowing what happened, etc.

    I find that having this all written down on a calendar is very helpful because it is a visual reminder not only of what I have to do, but that I have a plan, and that the plan is forgiving and can be rearranged. For day-to-day assignments, I use the basic notes app that came pre-installed on my phone. I used to use a planner, but the neater things look, the calmer I feel, so I prefer to copy and paste if plans change rather than to draw arrows all over the place and run out of room. Either way, the point is basically that of the calendar technique: The difference is that this technique using a notes app or a planner involves things to do from many different categories, rather than being only for one assignment, project, or test.

    These things are easy to cross of the to-do list, which feels awesome, and they also help me unwind enough to get back to the grind. Anyway, I always start my list with my schedule—the classes, meetings, meet-ups, work shifts, etc. My list usually never goes away for the entire semester, because I find it helpful to have multiple days— sometimes even upwards of two or three weeks—on my list, again, for the same reason as the calendar technique: A typical list might look like this:.

    Philosophy reading Highlight astronomy notes Email boss about work ideas Learn new song on guitar Finish drawing. Study for psych see calendar Practice cajon Saturday Dr. Stuck in traffic and not driving? Pull out your phone and study your vocab for that German test you have on Thursday.

    Are an inconvenient ten minutes early for lunch and still waiting for your friends to show? Those flashcards are waiting for you. Maybe after you read 20 pages, you get to go whiz down the road on your longboard at top speeds, pissing off all the cars in your path. Maybe after finishing an outline and intro paragraph for your paper, you get to go blow off steam at the gym. Finally, there are little things you can do day-to-day that will help you to feel organized.

    Keeping your room clean may help you keep your brain from feeling too cluttered. Being on top of emails helps me feel better, too. Try different things, and see what works for you! Procrastination happens, and you can still get the assignment in on time. This includes people need people around? Go to a library or ask friends to come over and study with you for support.

    Go to the top floor of the Honnold-Mudd Library, where sneezing and throat-clearing are discouraged , sounds music, outside noises, etc. Smells that you study with actually help jog your memory, so wearing a certain perfume for studying and the same perfume for test-taking can actually be helpful , sensations work best laying on your bed? Maybe you ask them to go to the Motley and grab you a bagel and coffee to help you through your allnighter.

    Maybe you forgot notebooks in your room and need them to bring them to you. Maybe you just want company. Asking for help when you need it is never a bad thing. Admitting mistakes is hard and painful, so if you do this once, you will probably hold yourself more accountable in the future.

    If you do this, though, be sure to also schedule in breaks! Burning out is the worst thing you can do with a deadline around the corner, and scheduling breaks into your hell day will help you avoid or postpone burning out burnout is one thing on which you should procrastinate for as long as possible! You are now viewing Redtube in English. You need the latest version of Adobe Flash Player to view this video.

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